Severe Style Greek Sculpture for Kids - the Severe Style, between the Archaic and the Classical
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Severe Style Greek Sculpture

Kritias boy
Kritias Boy (ca. 480 BC)

About the time of the Battle of Marathon, in 490 BC, Greek sculptors began to work in a new style, called the Severe style. This quickly replaced the old Archaic style.

zeus poseidon
Zeus or Poseidon throwing a spear (460 BC)

In the Severe style, sculptors began to make statues more true to life, and with more feeling in their faces and their movements. Instead of all being standing straight up and looking sacred and peaceful, now statues began to do things: drive a chariot, carry something, throw a spear, or ride a horse.

Here's a video of the Zeus-Poseidon statue so you can see it from all sides:


Click here for more about Severe Style Greek Sculpture


Or to find out more about Severe style Greek sculpture from books, check out these books on Amazon.com or at your library:

Ancient Greek Art, by Susie Hodge (1998)- for kids ages 9-12.

Greek Art and Archaeology (3rd Edition), by John G. Pedley (2002) This is NOT a children's book, but it has a lot of good information and is pretty readable. Plus, the author is really an expert in this field.

Greek Sculpture: The Classical Period, a Handbook, by John Boardman (1985). The standard text for introductory college classes. Includes the Severe style.

The severe style in Greek sculpture, by Brunilde Ridgway (1970). By an expert, for specialists.

Stone Age
Bronze Age
Dark Age
Archaic
Severe
Classical
Hellenistic

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Copyright 2012-2014 Karen Carr, Portland State University. This page last updated 2014. Powered by Dewahost.

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